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Light Work Gallery

Syracuse University
316 Waverly Ave.
Syracuse, NY 13244
Phone: 315-443-1300
info@lightwork.org
Website: www.lightwork.org
Light Work Gallery is on Facebook     Light Work Gallery is on Twitter

Hours: Sunday-Friday, 10am-6pm



Light Work Gallery Coming Events

Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, March 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, March 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, March 24, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, March 24, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, March 26, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, March 26, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, March 27, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, March 27, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, March 29, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, March 29, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, March 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, March 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, March 31, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, March 31, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 2, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 2, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, April 3, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, April 3, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, April 4, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, April 4, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, April 6, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, April 6, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, April 7, 2017, 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, April 7, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 9, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 9, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, April 10, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, April 10, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, April 11, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, April 11, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, April 12, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, April 12, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, April 13, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, April 13, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, April 14, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, April 14, 2017, 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 16, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 16, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, April 17, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, April 17, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, April 18, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, April 18, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, April 19, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, April 19, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, April 20, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, April 20, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, April 21, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, April 21, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, April 24, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, April 24, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, April 25, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, April 25, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, April 27, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, April 27, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, April 28, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, April 28, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 1, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 1, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 2, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 2, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 3, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 3, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 4, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 4, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 5, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 5, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, May 7, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, May 7, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 8, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 8, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 9, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 9, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 10, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 10, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 11, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 11, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 12, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 12, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, May 14, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, May 14, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 15, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 15, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 16, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 16, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 17, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 17, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 18, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 18, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 19, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 19, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, May 21, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, May 21, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 22, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 22, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 24, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 24, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 25, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 25, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 26, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 26, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, May 28, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, May 28, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 29, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 29, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 31, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 31, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, June 1, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, June 1, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, June 2, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, June 2, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, June 4, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, June 4, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, June 5, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, June 5, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, June 6, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, June 6, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, June 7, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, June 7, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, June 8, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, June 8, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, June 9, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, June 9, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, June 11, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, June 11, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, June 12, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, June 12, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, June 13, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, June 13, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, June 14, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, June 14, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, June 15, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, June 15, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, June 16, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, June 16, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, June 18, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, June 18, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, June 19, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, June 19, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, June 20, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, June 20, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, June 21, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, June 21, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, June 22, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, June 22, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, June 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, June 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, June 25, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, June 25, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, June 26, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, June 26, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, June 27, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, June 27, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, June 28, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, June 28, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, June 29, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, June 29, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, June 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, June 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, July 2, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, July 2, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, July 3, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, July 3, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, July 4, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, July 4, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, July 5, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, July 5, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, July 6, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, July 6, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, July 7, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, July 7, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, July 9, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, July 9, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, July 10, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, July 10, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, July 11, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, July 11, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, July 12, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, July 12, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, July 13, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, July 13, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, July 14, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, July 14, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, July 16, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, July 16, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, July 17, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, July 17, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, July 18, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, July 18, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, July 19, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, July 19, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, July 20, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, July 20, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, July 21, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, July 21, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, July 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, July 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, July 24, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, July 24, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, July 25, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, July 25, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, July 26, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, July 26, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


Eric Gottesman: If I Could See Your Face, I Would Not Need Food (Ka Fitfitu Feetu)

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, July 27, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1999, artist Eric Gottesman began making portraits in Ethiopia of people with HIV. Because great stigma surrounds this disease, subjects did not allow him to photograph their faces. Over the next five years, Gottesman made these portraits of people with HIV anonymous by hiding and obscuring their faces and changing each sitter's name to protect their identity. A transcribed text from each sitter describing life with HIV in Ethiopia accompanies each image. In 2004, a woman with HIV allowed him to photograph her face for the first time and he knew the project was completed.


George Awde: Scale Without Measure

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, July 27, 2017, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

George Awde's photographic work explores themes of contemporary masculinity, the male body, homosociality, and notions of physical and psychological strength, as seen through young men with whom he identifies. The men and boys whom Awde has photographed over the last 10 years include migrants to Beirut from Syria. Many are now his close friends. Through years of contact, Awde has established close relationships allowing for an intimate portrayal of the everyday. His pictures explore the way that people interact with one another, and in them one senses a longing to belong. Awde's parents fled Lebanon in the conflicts leading to the 1970s Civil War in order to pursue their futures by coming to America. This informed Awde's perspective on the world and his place in it while growing up, and now informs his practice as an artist and teacher. As the global refugee crisis escalates, and the early executive orders of a new and contentious president attempt to aggressively block refugees from entering the United States, the themes of Awde's work are evermore present.


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