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Everson Museum of Art

401 Harrison St.
Syracuse, NY 13202
Phone: 315-474-6064
everson@everson.org
Website: www.everson.org
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Everson Museum of Art Coming Events

Arise Unique

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, September 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Coordinated by Arise, a non-profit agency based in Syracuse, Unique celebrates the artistic talents of Central New Yorkers living with disabilities. The works included in this exhibition eloquently speak to the myriad thoughts, ideas, and feelings that all humans share, regardless of individual ability or circumstance. The annual competition invites submissions of art and literature which are then selected for display by a panel of judges, and the works are exhibited in several venues throughout CNY.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, September 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, September 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, September 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, September 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, September 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Arise Unique

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Coordinated by Arise, a non-profit agency based in Syracuse, Unique celebrates the artistic talents of Central New Yorkers living with disabilities. The works included in this exhibition eloquently speak to the myriad thoughts, ideas, and feelings that all humans share, regardless of individual ability or circumstance. The annual competition invites submissions of art and literature which are then selected for display by a panel of judges, and the works are exhibited in several venues throughout CNY.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Exhibition Talk: Monumental
Featuring Dr. Mary Ann Calo

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 6:30 PM


Price: Free with museum admission


Hosmer Auditorium, Everson Museum
401 Harrison St., Syracuse


Arise Unique

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, September 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Coordinated by Arise, a non-profit agency based in Syracuse, Unique celebrates the artistic talents of Central New Yorkers living with disabilities. The works included in this exhibition eloquently speak to the myriad thoughts, ideas, and feelings that all humans share, regardless of individual ability or circumstance. The annual competition invites submissions of art and literature which are then selected for display by a panel of judges, and the works are exhibited in several venues throughout CNY.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, September 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, September 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, September 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, September 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, September 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Arise Unique

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, September 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Coordinated by Arise, a non-profit agency based in Syracuse, Unique celebrates the artistic talents of Central New Yorkers living with disabilities. The works included in this exhibition eloquently speak to the myriad thoughts, ideas, and feelings that all humans share, regardless of individual ability or circumstance. The annual competition invites submissions of art and literature which are then selected for display by a panel of judges, and the works are exhibited in several venues throughout CNY.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, September 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, September 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, September 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, September 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, September 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Arise Unique

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Coordinated by Arise, a non-profit agency based in Syracuse, Unique celebrates the artistic talents of Central New Yorkers living with disabilities. The works included in this exhibition eloquently speak to the myriad thoughts, ideas, and feelings that all humans share, regardless of individual ability or circumstance. The annual competition invites submissions of art and literature which are then selected for display by a panel of judges, and the works are exhibited in several venues throughout CNY.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 4, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 4, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 4, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 4, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 4, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 5, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 5, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 5, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 5, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 5, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 6, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 6, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 6, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 6, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 6, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 7, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 7, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 7, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 7, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 7, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 11, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 11, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 11, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 11, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 11, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 12, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 12, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 12, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 12, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 12, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 13, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 13, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 13, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 13, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 13, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 14, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 14, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 14, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 14, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 14, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 18, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 18, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 18, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 18, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 18, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 19, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 19, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 19, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 19, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 19, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 20, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 20, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 20, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 20, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 20, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 21, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 21, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 21, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 21, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 21, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, October 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 28, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 28, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 28, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 28, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, October 28, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, October 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 2, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 2, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 2, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 2, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 2, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 3, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 3, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 3, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 3, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 3, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 4, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 4, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 4, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 4, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 4, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 5, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 5, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 5, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 5, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 5, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 9, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 9, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 9, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 9, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 9, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 10, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 10, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 10, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 10, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 10, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 11, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 11, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 11, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 11, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 11, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 12, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 12, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 12, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 12, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 12, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 16, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 16, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 16, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 16, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 16, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 17, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 17, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 17, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 17, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 17, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 18, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 18, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 18, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 18, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 18, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 19, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 19, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 19, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 19, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 19, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 23, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 24, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 24, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 24, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 24, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, November 24, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 25, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 25, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 25, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 25, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, November 25, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 26, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 26, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 26, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 26, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A changing project room of curated objects and original works

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 200,000 people, severely injuring countless more, and immediately raising the specter, still with us, of total annihilation. Three days later Nagasaki, Japan, suffered the same fate. The impact of these bombings on the way we view the world cannot be understated. Historian Robert Jay Lifton has written: "You cannot understand the twentieth century without Hiroshima."

Yet, how exactly do we regard Hiroshima (understood not only as referring collectively to both the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also all such possible catastrophes to come), particularly as it fades in cultural memory? How can we find its present urgency? This exhibition is one humble attempt to grapple with this difficult question. It takes the form of a project room that will undergo three transformations between August 19 and November 26.

For the first phase of the exhibition (August 19-October 18), Syracuse University Professors Yutaka Sho, Susannah Sayler, and Edward Morris have curated images and objects from Syracuse University and Everson collections that were created in 1945, the year that bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. None of these images and objects were made with Hiroshima specifically in mind. Some of them relate directly to the war; some of them do not. Together, however, they form a montage made from the artifacts of history and bear upon the spirit of the times in a way that could not be accomplished by a direct or literal treatment. The montage needs to be activated with reflection.

Students in a studio class taught by Professors Sho and Morris will continue to transform the exhibition in two additional phases, opening on October 18 and November 16 respectively.

The exhibition is part of a larger program at Syracuse University and other locations in the city that centers around a visit in October of one survivor from Hiroshima, Keiko Ogura. Ms. Ogura was eight years old when the bomb fell, and she has since become the official A-bomb storyteller for the city of Hiroshima and tireless advocate for peace and nuclear nonproliferation issues that have gained an unexpected urgency in recent months.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, November 26, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 30, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 30, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 30, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, November 30, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 2, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 2, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 2, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 2, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 3, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 3, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 3, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 3, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 6, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 6, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 6, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 6, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 7, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 7, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 7, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 7, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 8, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 9, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 9, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 9, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 9, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 10, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 10, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 10, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 10, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 13, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 13, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 13, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 13, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 14, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 14, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 14, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 14, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 15, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 16, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 16, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 16, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 16, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 17, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 17, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 17, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 17, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 20, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 20, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 20, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 20, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 21, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 21, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 21, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 21, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 22, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 23, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 24, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 24, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 24, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 24, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, December 27, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 28, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 28, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 28, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, December 28, 2017, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, December 29, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, December 30, 2017, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


Focus

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 31, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

A new exhibition series at the Everson, "FOCUS" presents a few selected works from the Museum's collection in order to spark dialogue about how objects relate to one another across time, medium, and subject matter. For its first iteration, Adelaide Alsop Robineau's Cinerary Urn is paired with 19th-century paintings.


Monumental

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 31, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

The Everson's expansive exhibition spaces, designed by I.M. Pei, allow the Museum to acquire and display monumentally-sized artwork. With this opportunity comes the unique challenges of caring for and exhibiting oversized work. Monumental features rarely seen large-scale pieces by
John de Andrea, Harmony Hammond, Sadashi Inuzuka, Sol LeWitt, Dennis Oppenheim, and Arnie Zimmerman, drawn from the Everson's collection, in order to foster a community conversation about the benefits and challenges associated with displaying oversized work.



Suné Woods: When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 31, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

Based in Los Angeles, Suné Woods works in multi-channel video installations, photography, and collage. Presenting intimate vignettes of couples or solitary actions of individuals in two video installations, "When a heart scatter, scatter, scatter" is a vulnerable exploration of desire, forgiveness, and resilience.


TR Ericsson: I Was Born To Bring You Into This World

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, December 31, 2017, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM


Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison St., Syracuse

TR Ericsson uses the story of his mother to present a searing, soft, and complex portrait of post-industrial life in America. Ericsson constructs his work using traditional art materials such as canvas, bronze, photography, and clay as well as video, found objects, and heirlooms taken from his family archives. This exhibition is a specific reinterpretation of Crackle & Drag, Ericsson's ongoing project started during the years following his mother's suicide in 2003.

"I Was Born To Bring You Into This World" begins as an intimate encounter with an artist's family archive and becomes a potent opportunity to reflect and scrutinize the trials and tribulations of our own lives.


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